Essential Oil / Herbal Webinars

I spent the months leading up to my retirement worrying that I’d be bored, sitting around staring out the window with little to no contact with another living, breathing person. But I’ve found that I have about a bazillion things I want to accomplish and I’ve been just as busy, if not more, than when I was working on a schedule. But I like it!

Having retired after 13 years of managing a complementary therapies program in hospice and also creating separate products through my outside company for about 11 of those years, I’ve finally managed to put together a series of webinars to pass on the knowledge. Since I started in hospice, about half of my webinars are hospice-related but the other half are appropriate for almost anyone – individuals with little to no experience working with essential oils and herbs and massage therapists who want to tailor a product to a specific client or two.

My first two are scheduled and I’m busy finding phone numbers for as many hospices in the U.S. as I can and calling them to get an email address where I can send my list of topics. Don’t think that doesn’t take some time and energy!

hand-in-hand-1686811_1280So I’m starting with “Starting a Hospice Aromatherapy Program,” followed by “A Beginner’s guide to Essential Oil Safety.” Too many people are out there hawking oils with absolutely no understanding of the chemistry or of creating effective and safe therapeutic dosages. I used to get calls from all over the nation from other hospices who heard we were using essential oils for symptom management and they wanted to know how we set up the program, what permissions we needed, what training the coordinator needed, what symptoms to focus on and how to determine safe limits for the formulas. I have a few ideas to offer.

But then I’ve also applied to be a provider for Nevada massage therapists and once that’s approved (hopefully), I have a few webinars designed to help them create blends that can be used for specific client issues: oils for minor skin problems, salves for cuts and scars and body butters for emotional issues. Many of these are appropriate for   glass-3141865_1280individuals who want to learn to make their own herbal tinctures, herbal-infused oils, and lotions and body butters. So each webinar’s hand-out will include a recipe to get them started. I think the beginners will be amazed at how simple some of them are to make.

My other topics so far include “Carrier and Essential Oils for Muscles and Joints,” “Combating Stress, Anxiety and Insomnia with Essential Oils & Herbs,” “Essential Oils for Symptom Management,” “Essential Oils and Herbal Aids to Combat Constipation,” “Formulating Effective Salves for Cuts, Scrapes & Burns,” “Aromatherapy and the Mind: Essential Oils for Common Emotional Issues,” and “Herbal-Infused Oils and Body Butters for Common Skin Issues.”

mortar-3511896_1280Wish me luck. For years I’ve wanted to have the time and energy to teach webinars and include as much of the information I’ve amassed over the years as possible. I hope it goes well and that I can end up adding lots more topics. What a great thing for me to do in my retirement to keep me busy and engaged. If you’re so inclined, jump over to http://www.scentsibility.net and see if one of them grabs your interest.

The Senior Free-Time Routine

The closer I get to retirement, the more nervous I get. I’m not quite sure why. Fear of the unknown? It occurred to me that all the people I talk to on a daily basis are at work. Yes, I talk to my cats, but conversation is sparse.

So I decided to start early and work on a daily calendar that will fill up every day of my first month of retirement for a couple of reasons: (1) to try to get into some good habits from Day 1 so I’m not sitting around the house, either endlessly napping or stuffing food in my mouth; and (2) to make sure I do things that make me happy, keep me healthy and active, and show me that all that free time I thought I wanted was really worth it. But I’m struggling.

I made a list of all the things I would definitely do, some of the things I might do and the things I’d love to do but probably won’t be able to afford. My days look a bit dreary . . . and that makes me nervous all over again.

I even assigned them times so I could see how much of my day would be occupied. No surprise it adds up to about the amount of time I’d spend at work. And I included generous amounts of time as well in case something was so damned interesting that I got lost in it and before I knew it, an extra half hour or so had sped past. I have things like working on my novel, cooking nicer meals than I’d normally prepare, perhaps purchasing and riding a bicycle – not only as good exercise but because I loved riding a bike as a kid, marketing my company to small businesses around town, querying and submitting articles to magazines, reading, etc.

In the process of trying to find a suitable picture of what a senior’s calendar of events would look like, I found this toddler’s calendar and decided it looked dangerously close to mine. Our RoutineI know I’ve made some jokes about it, but it seriously worries me that I’ll hate the free time I’ve dreamed of, wish I could go back to work and then nobody will hire me because I’m too old. I have images in my head of lonely, bored seniors sitting at home staring out the window and I don’t want to be one of them. With any kind of luck, I’ll relish the time that’s all mine, all day – nobody to answer to, no time limitations or deadlines. That prospect excites me.

But there’s still that little negativity imp sitting on my shoulder whispering that I’m making a mistake and should work until I die. I’ll let you know who wins in a couple of months.